Income protection insurance

No one is immune to the risk of illness and accidents

No one likes to think that something bad will happen to them. But, if you couldn’t work due to a serious illness, how would you manage financially? Could you survive on savings or sick pay from work? If not, you may need some other way to keep paying the bills – and you might want to consider income protection insurance. Continue reading…


Critical illness cover

If the worst does happen, it’s important to make sure you’re financially protected

We never think a critical illness is going to happen to us, especially when we feel fit and healthy, but it can and does. If the worst does happen, it’s important to make sure you’re financially protected against the impact a critical illness could have on you and your family.  Continue reading…


Whole-of-life insurance

Guaranteed financial protection that lasts for the rest of your life

A whole-of-life insurance policy is designed to give you a specified amount of cover for the whole of your life and pays out when you die, whenever that is. Because it’s guaranteed that you’ll die at some point (and therefore that the policy will have to pay out), these policies are more expensive than term insurance policies which only pay out if you die within a certain timeframe. Continue reading…


Term life insurance

Protection for a specified fixed period of time

With a term life insurance policy, you choose the amount you want to be insured for and the period for which you want cover. This is the most basic type of life insurance. If you die within the term, the policy pays out to your beneficiaries. If you don’t die during the term, the policy doesn’t pay out and the premiums you’ve paid are not returned to you.  Continue reading…


Different types of life insurance

Choosing the right type of cover

‘Single life’ policies cover just one person. A ‘joint life’ policy covers two people, and when one person on the policy dies the money is paid out and the policy ends. You will need to decide whether the joint policy pays out on first or second death as this will determine when the policy ends. Continue reading…


Life insurance

Providing a financial safety net for your loved ones

Getting the right life insurance policy means working out how much money you need to protect your dependants. This sum must take into account their living costs, as well as any outstanding debts such as a mortgage. It may be the case that not everyone needs life insurance (also known as ‘life cover’ and ‘death cover’). But if your spouse and children, partner, or other relatives depend on your income to cover the mortgage or other living expenses, then the answer is ‘yes’. Continue reading…


Brexit: pensions

Existing commitments re-examined in post-Brexit climate

During the referendum campaign, the Prime Minister, David Cameron, said the so-called ‘triple lock’ for state pensions would be threatened by a UK Brexit. In their 2015 election manifesto, the Conservatives promised to extend the triple lock on state pensions – a guarantee that they rise every year until 2020 by at least 2.5%, the rate of inflation or growth in earnings if it is higher. until 2020. Continue reading…


Brexit: Investments

Maintaining a long-term perspective is the key to investment success

As was widely predicted, a vote to leave the EU wiped billions off companies’ share prices. Low interest rates and volatile stock markets are likely to be the order of the day for the foreseeable future, and any rise in interest rates would be good news for savers. Continue reading…


Brexit: Taxation

No laws have changed

A week before the EU referendum, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, warned that a vote to leave the EU might result in tax increases too. He spoke about a 2p rise on the basic tax rate (currently 20p in the pound) and a 3p rise in the higher rate (currently 40p). He also said Inheritance Tax (IHT) might rise by 5p from its current 40p in the pound. But to do so would go against the Conservative Government’s promises at the last general election, making this decision to implementdifficult politically. Continue reading…


Brexit: Mortgages

Will the Bank of England cut interest rates?

Before the EU referendum vote, the Treasury predicted a vote for Brexit would mean a rise of between 0.7% and 1.1% in borrowing costs. The Prime Minister, David Cameron, claimed the average cost of a mortgage could increase by up to £1,000 a year. Continue reading…